Draft Timeline of Czech and Czech-American History

It's time to start inserting dates from Czech-American history, both in the US as a whole and in Northeast Ohio.

1355: Charles IV is crowned Holy Roman Emperor; Makes Prague the capital (MO; Otfinoski, Steven. Nations in Transition: The Czech Republic. (New York: Facts On File, 1997), 111)

1526: Ferdinand I, Habsburg ruler, becomes king of Bohemia (MO; Otfinoski, Steven. Nations in Transition: The Czech Republic. (New York: Facts On File, 1997),112)

1618: Czech revolt starts Thirty Year's War (MO; Otfinoski, Steven. Nations in Transition: The Czech Republic. (New York: Facts On File, 1997), 112)

1620: Battle of White Mountain - Bohemia lost it's independence commencing life under Habsburg rule.
(MO; Kutak, Robert, The Story of a Bohemian-American Village (New York; Arno Press, 1970), 8.)

1848: Gustav Adam first Czech settler (Habenicht, Jan. History of Czechs in America)

1848-70: Peasants and skilled craftsmen from the villages also immigrated to America (Encyclopedia of Cleveland History)

1849: Unsuccessful revolution occurs under the Habsburg rule, many Czechs begin to immigrate (EKS; Pike, Kermit J., and John J. Grabowski. The Peoples of Cleveland. Cleveland: Western Reserve Historical Society, 1942)

1850-1868: First wave of Czech immigration to the United States (Rossi, Jeanne Koti, Children of Czech Immigrants: Education and Acculturation In Cleveland, Ohio, 1920-1940, CSU Ph.D. 2006, 4)

1850: Three Czech families settle in Cleveland (EKS; Pike, Kermit J., and John J. Grabowski. The Peoples of Cleveland. Cleveland: Western Reserve Historical Society, 1942)
1850: There were 3 Czech families in Cleveland; (Encyclopedia of Cleveland History) [duplicate]

1852: Bohemian settlers refused lodgings in Cleveland. Sixteen families were temporarily housed in a wagon shed (EKS; Pike, Kermit J., and John J. Grabowski. The Peoples of Cleveland. Cleveland: Western Reserve Historical Society, 1942)

1853: J. Capek and J. Doubrava bought farms, becoming the first Czech farmers in Cleveland (EKS; Pike, Kermit J., and John J. Grabowski. The Peoples of Cleveland. Cleveland: Western Reserve Historical Society, 1942)

1857: First Czech priest arrives in Cleveland, his name was Antonin Krasny (EKS; Pike, Kermit J., and John J. Grabowski. The Peoples of Cleveland. Cleveland: Western Reserve Historical Society, 1942)


1860: Fifteen Czech families now in the Cleveland area (EKS; Pike, Kermit J., and John J. Grabowski. The Peoples of Cleveland. Cleveland: Western Reserve Historical Society, 1942)

1862: Sokol started in Prague (Rossi, Jeanne Koti, Children of Czech Immigrants: Education and Acculturation In Cleveland, Ohio, 1920-1940, CSU Ph.D. 2006, 34)

1862: “Slovanska Lipa” (the Slavonic lime-tree) first Czech organiztion in Cleveland is formed (CH, Ledbetter, Eleanor E. The Czechs of Cleveland. Cleveland: Americanization Committee, 1919.)

1865-1866: Largest immigration to Cleveland (Habenicht, Jan. History of Czechs in America)

1867: Habsburgs join with Hungary to form Austro-Hungarian Empire (MO; Otfinoski, Steven. Nations in Transition: The Czech Republic. (New York: Facts On File, 1997), 112)

1867: A musical organization, the
LUMIR-HLAHOL-TYL SINGING SOCIETY, was established in Cleveland, (Encyclopedia of Cleveland History)

1867: The first Czech Catholic church in Cleveland was ST. WENCESLAS CHURCH, founded at the corner of Arch and Burwell streets, and named after the Czech patron saint (Encyclopedia of Cleveland History)

1870: Sokol gymnastics started in Cleveland with the founding of Sokol Perun (Rossi, Jeanne Koti, Children of Czech Immigrants: Education and Acculturation In Cleveland, Ohio, 1920-1940, CSU Ph.D. 2006)

1870: Women’s socities Benevolent Sisterhood Union and Unoin of Czech women are organized (CH, Ledbetter, Eleanor E. The Czechs of Cleveland. Cleveland: Americanization Committee, 1919.)

1870: 696 Czech families, or 3,252 individuals, resided in the city. (Encyclopedia of Cleveland History) [see 1880 entry for conflicting information]

1870 and World War I: The largest wave of Czech migration occurred (Encyclopedia of Cleveland History)

1871: First Czech newspaper is established, it was called the Pokrok or Progress (EKS; Pike, Kermit J., and John J. Grabowski. The Peoples of Cleveland. Cleveland: Western Reserve Historical Society, 1942)

1874: St. Procop Chruch is founded (CH, Ledbetter, Eleanor E. The Czechs of Cleveland. Cleveland: Americanization Committee, 1919.)

1879: The first Sokol unit in Cleveland, Sokol Czech, was organized (Encyclopedia of Cleveland History)

1879: CZECH CATHOLIC UNION formed, a national fraternal benefit society with its national headquarters located in Cleveland at 5349 Dolloff Rd. Organized in Cleveland's St. Wenceslaus parish by Rev. Anthony Hynek (Encyclopedia of Cleveland History)

1880s: More than half of Czech-Americans had left the church. (Encyclopedia of Cleveland History)

1880: Czech families increase to 696 or 3252 individuals (EKS; Pike, Kermit J., and John J. Grabowski. The Peoples of Cleveland. Cleveland: Western Reserve Historical Society, 1942) [see 1870 entry for conflicting information]

1881: The Dramitic Society Tyl is formed (CH; Campbell, Thomas F., and Edward M. Miggins. The Birth fo Modern Celevland 1865-1930. London: Associated UPes)

1882: St. Adalbert’s Chruch is founded (CH, Ledbetter, Eleanor E. The Czechs of Cleveland. Cleveland: Americanization Committee, 1919.)

1883: Our Lady of Lourdes Chruch is founded (CH, Ledbetter, Eleanor E. The Czechs of Cleveland. Cleveland: Americanization Committee, 1919.)

1889: Bohemian National Hall is built on Broadway Ave (EKS; Pike, Kermit J., and John J. Grabowski. The Peoples of Cleveland. Cleveland: Western Reserve Historical Society, 1942)

1890: There were 10,000 Czechs in Cleveland, (Encyclopedia of Cleveland History)

1890 to World War I: Second wave of Czech immigration (Rossi, Jeanne Koti, Children of Czech Immigrants: Education and Acculturation In Cleveland, Ohio, 1920-1940, CSU Ph.D. 2006, 4)

1900 to 1914: Witnessed the greatest influx of Czech immigrants to the area (Encyclopedia of Cleveland History)

1901: Total population 381,768, 20,000 being Czech dissent (Habenicht, Jan. History of Czechs in America)

1902: St. John Nepomucene is founded (CH, Ledbetter, Eleanor E. The Czechs of Cleveland. Cleveland: Americanization Committee, 1919.)

1909: The weekly
AMERICKE DELNICKE LISTY (American Workman's News) began publication (Encyclopedia of Cleveland History)

1942: Democrat Frank J. Svoboda, born in Bohemia, won election to the Ohio house of representatives, serving 2 terms (1943-44, 1945-46); then was elected to 6 terms in the Ohio senate, served the longest of any legislator elected from Cleveland (Encyclopedia of Cleveland History)

1948-62: Approximately 30,000 Czechoslovakians arrived in the U.S. (Encyclopedia of Cleveland History)

1970: Roughly 47,000 Czechs lived in metropolitan Cleveland. (Encyclopedia of Cleveland History)

1970: DTJ council permanently moved to Taborville (EKS;
Giles, Kirsti. Taborville. Geauga County Bicentennial Board of Mangers. Ohio Humanities Council Grant. August 2002)

1970’s: Gymnasium added to the Taborville DTJ hall (EKS; Demirjian, Joan. "Centennial Celebration: DTJ Taborville began as gymnastics organization." Chagrin Valley Times, March 19, 2009)

1983: The number had fallen to 37,000 because of emigration restrictions of the Communist government in Czechoslovakia, and a general decline in the area's total population (Encyclopedia of Cleveland History)

1990s: 37,000 people of Czech birth or background resided in the metropolitan area (Encyclopedia of Cleveland History)